Sussex Dragonfly Group

Norfolk Hawker (Green-eyed Hawker)
Anaciaeschna isoceles (Müller, 1767)
Synonym: Aeshna isosceles
« Aeshna mixta | Anax ephippiger »

Suborder: Anisoptera
Family: Aeshnidae

Norfolk Hawker
(Green-eyed Hawker)
Anaciaeschna isoceles
Synonym: Aeshna isosceles

Suborder: Anisoptera
Family: Aeshnidae

Otherwise known as the Green-eyed Hawker, this is a recent vagrant to Sussex with just one record up to 2020.

Anaciaeschna isoceles
1 / 3
female
Photo: David Sadler
Anaciaeschna isoceles
2 / 3
male
Photo: David Sadler
Anaciaeschna isoceles
3 / 3
male
Photo: David Sadler

More images

National status
As its name suggests, the Norfolk Hawker’s breeding area is currently restricted to parts of East Anglia namely the Broadlands of Norfolk and north-east Suffolk. There are scattered records elsewhere in England including from the south in Kent, Hampshire and Devon. It is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act.

Status in Sussex
There has been just one record of this species - one on 5 July 2019 at Medmerry RSPB Reserve found by John Arnott and photographed by Christian Hance.

Distribution at 1km scale

Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution (all)
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution pre 1980
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 1980 - 1989
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 1990 - 1999
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2000 - 2009
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2010 - 2019
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2010 on

Flight times
May - August ( BDS website)

Phenology (adult)

Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology (all)
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology pre 1980
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 1980 - 1989
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 1990 - 1999
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2000 - 2009
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2010 - 2019
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2010 on

Habitat
Fens and grazing marshes that are relatively free of water pollution. Presence of Water Soldier (Stratiotes aloides) seems to be one important prerequisite for breeding.

Similar species
The bright green eyes and brown body of this dragonfly distinguish it from all but the immature Southern Migrant Hawker which has duller green eyes and a more gingery-brown abdomen with yellow markings along its length. The Brown Hawker has distinctly brown wings.

Otherwise known as the Green-eyed Hawker, this is a recent vagrant to Sussex with just one record up to 2020.

Anaciaeschna isoceles
1 / 3
female
Photo: David Sadler
Anaciaeschna isoceles
2 / 3
male
Photo: David Sadler
Anaciaeschna isoceles
3 / 3
male
Photo: David Sadler

National status
As its name suggests, the Norfolk Hawker’s breeding area is currently restricted to parts of East Anglia namely the Broadlands of Norfolk and north-east Suffolk. There are scattered records elsewhere in England including from the south in Kent, Hampshire and Devon. It is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act.

Status in Sussex
There has been just one record of this species - one on 5 July 2019 at Medmerry RSPB Reserve found by John Arnott and photographed by Christian Hance.

Distribution at 1km scale

Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution (all)
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution bre 1980
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 1980 - 1989
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 1990 - 1999
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2000 - 2009
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2010 - 2019
Anaciaeschna isoceles distribution 2020 on

Flight times
May - August ( BDS website)

Phenology (adult)

Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology (all)
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology pre 1980
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 1980 - 1989
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 1990 - 1999
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2000 - 2009
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2010 - 2019
Anaciaeschna isoceles phenology 2020 on

Habitat
Fens and grazing marshes that are relatively free of water pollution. Presence of Water Soldier (Stratiotes aloides) seems to be one important prerequisite for breeding.

Similar species
The bright green eyes and brown body of this dragonfly distinguish it from all but the immature Southern Migrant Hawker which has duller green eyes and a more gingery-brown abdomen with yellow markings along its length. The Brown Hawker has distinctly brown wings.